Twitter Analytics 

The Story: Twitter gives brands access to their organic tweet data, allowing advertisers to more effectively track performance and use these insights to inform their content and paid media strategies.

Why It Matters: Armed with detailed metrics like impressions, clicks-by-type, and engagement rate on each organic tweet, brands can more effectively apply a data-driven approach to their paid media and content strategies, swiftly allocating paid support to top-performing posts and using these granular insights to understand which types of their content perform best.



When Real Time Marketing Bites

The Story: The 2014 World Cup was like an exposé on brands trying to leverage cultural cachet to their advantage – and it got messy.

Why It Matters: During the World Cup, brands continued fighting for real-time relevance, some with purpose and others seemingly without. We’re not ones to call people out, but with so many gaffes and “Why are they tweeting about this?” moments, we have to remember: while timeliness and relevance are key components of a successful social media strategy, the content being published has to serve the brand. What are the long-term benefits of real-time brand commentary around the World Cup for a mouthwash brand, for example? Unless brands can clearly answer this question, they’re just mindlessly adding noise to the newsfeed, causing more harm than good.



Apple Poaches Yet Another Luxury Executive

The Story: Apple poached Tag Heuer’s former VP of sales & retail, Patrick Pruniaux, in a move that may signal brand movement in the luxury wearables category.

Why It Matters: Apple’s foray into wearables will not only be functional, but also fashionable. With their team of luxury executives, including YSL CEO Paul Deneve and former Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts, the brand is also thinking beyond the Apple Store. Pruniaux provides Apple with a knowledge of the luxury wristwatch market, which no other smartwatch manufacturer is taking advantage of. Doubts remain around Apple’s ability to revolutionize the category in a post-Steve Jobs world. Can they revamp wearables like they did smartphones with the iPhone?



LeBron Decision 2.0 - a Lesson in Effective PR

The Story: It’s been four years since LeBron took his talents to South Beach, now he’s back in Cleveland. What we learned is a lesson in effective PR.

Why It Matters: Writing a sincere letter was a simple but effective move in owning his announcement and finding a way to speak directly to his fanbase. This was a complete 180 from the PR circus around his move to the Heat in 2010, and there was a lot less backlash as a result. The way “Decision 2.0” was orchestrated ultimately shows that transparency, emotion and pragmatism make an effective PR strategy.



Potato Salad Kickstarter 

The Story: A guy from Columbus, OH raised over $50,000 on Kickstarter to fund his first-ever attempt at making homemade potato salad.

Why It Matters: Yes, it was a simple stunt, but over 6,200 backers and $51,000 later, Zack “Danger” Brown created an Internet-backed phenomenon. This just illustrates the Internet’s fascination with promoting crazy ideas and the power of the bandwagon effect. It only takes that first share to start a phenomenon. If content is authentic, resonant and shareable, it’ll spread. At the end of the day, sometimes the simplest idea wins.



Email Newsletters: Don’t Call It a Comeback

The Story: Email newsletters have a “renaissance.”

Why It Matters: While some are confused why e-mail newsletters, covered with laughing irony by David Carr, are apparently “back” as a viable communications channel, for many marketers, email feels like a direct signal through the clutter of noise on the Internet. Perhaps with information overload on blogs and social media, a ping in the inbox is of greater value than ever. And proof for B2B marketers: 60% of executives now check an email newsletter daily.

Twitter Analytics

The Story: Twitter gives brands access to their organic tweet data, allowing advertisers to more effectively track performance and use these insights to inform their content and paid media strategies.

Why It Matters: Armed with detailed metrics like impressions, clicks-by-type, and engagement rate on each organic tweet, brands can more effectively apply a data-driven approach to their paid media and content strategies, swiftly allocating paid support to top-performing posts and using these granular insights to understand which types of their content perform best.


When Real Time Marketing Bites

The Story: The 2014 World Cup was like an exposé on brands trying to leverage cultural cachet to their advantage – and it got messy.

Why It Matters: During the World Cup, brands continued fighting for real-time relevance, some with purpose and others seemingly without. We’re not ones to call people out, but with so many gaffes and “Why are they tweeting about this?” moments, we have to remember: while timeliness and relevance are key components of a successful social media strategy, the content being published has to serve the brand. What are the long-term benefits of real-time brand commentary around the World Cup for a mouthwash brand, for example? Unless brands can clearly answer this question, they’re just mindlessly adding noise to the newsfeed, causing more harm than good.


Apple Poaches Yet Another Luxury Executive

The Story: Apple poached Tag Heuer’s former VP of sales & retail, Patrick Pruniaux, in a move that may signal brand movement in the luxury wearables category.

Why It Matters: Apple’s foray into wearables will not only be functional, but also fashionable. With their team of luxury executives, including YSL CEO Paul Deneve and former Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts, the brand is also thinking beyond the Apple Store. Pruniaux provides Apple with a knowledge of the luxury wristwatch market, which no other smartwatch manufacturer is taking advantage of. Doubts remain around Apple’s ability to revolutionize the category in a post-Steve Jobs world. Can they revamp wearables like they did smartphones with the iPhone?


LeBron Decision 2.0 - a Lesson in Effective PR

The Story: It’s been four years since LeBron took his talents to South Beach, now he’s back in Cleveland. What we learned is a lesson in effective PR.

Why It Matters: Writing a sincere letter was a simple but effective move in owning his announcement and finding a way to speak directly to his fanbase. This was a complete 180 from the PR circus around his move to the Heat in 2010, and there was a lot less backlash as a result. The way “Decision 2.0” was orchestrated ultimately shows that transparency, emotion and pragmatism make an effective PR strategy.


Potato Salad Kickstarter

The Story: A guy from Columbus, OH raised over $50,000 on Kickstarter to fund his first-ever attempt at making homemade potato salad.

Why It Matters: Yes, it was a simple stunt, but over 6,200 backers and $51,000 later, Zack “Danger” Brown created an Internet-backed phenomenon. This just illustrates the Internet’s fascination with promoting crazy ideas and the power of the bandwagon effect. It only takes that first share to start a phenomenon. If content is authentic, resonant and shareable, it’ll spread. At the end of the day, sometimes the simplest idea wins.


Email Newsletters: Don’t Call It a Comeback

The Story: Email newsletters have a “renaissance.”

Why It Matters: While some are confused why e-mail newsletters, covered with laughing irony by David Carr, are apparently “back” as a viable communications channel, for many marketers, email feels like a direct signal through the clutter of noise on the Internet. Perhaps with information overload on blogs and social media, a ping in the inbox is of greater value than ever. And proof for B2B marketers: 60% of executives now check an email newsletter daily.

It’s the close of July, but it’s the peak of the summer. Even in New York City, the metropolis known primarily for its tireless rat race, the summer heat can slow everyone down.

Yet while the heat melts the motivation out of the masses, the Superdesk remains super-charged as the Barbarian interns are gearing up to take a break from all things digital and devote a day to the helping the community. We recently spent a day with New York Cares, an organization that strives for the betterment of neglected areas in New York City.



We registered for a project to paint and prime walls of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Early Childhood Development Center in Brooklyn. Our group was involved with Phase One: scraping the walls clean, taping of areas that did not need to be painted, and priming the walls for the actual paint job. It was hot and sticky and the rooms were tiny and dusty, but I believe that I speak on behalf of all my fellow interns when I say that it was one of the most fruitful moments of our internship.



Being able to give back to society is truly a privilege and one that few can afford. I feel humbled to think that our small actions of painting a wall may brighten the lives of  the children.  I personally believe it is important that we all do our part in our own little way, for each action contributes to the grand total. The Barbarian interns plan to follow through by hosting a company potluck lunch, the proceeds of which will go back to New York Cares.

After all, it costs you nothing to put a smile on the face of another!







My name is Akshay Kapur. I’m the Finance intern from Mumbai, India. I’m a rising senior at Franklin & Marshall College out in Lancaster Pennsylvania, where I’m majoring in Business, Organizations and Society when I’m not chilling with the Amish folk.

It’s the close of July, but it’s the peak of the summer. Even in New York City, the metropolis known primarily for its tireless rat race, the summer heat can slow everyone down.

Yet while the heat melts the motivation out of the masses, the Superdesk remains super-charged as the Barbarian interns are gearing up to take a break from all things digital and devote a day to the helping the community. We recently spent a day with New York Cares, an organization that strives for the betterment of neglected areas in New York City.



We registered for a project to paint and prime walls of the Bedford-Stuyvesant Early Childhood Development Center in Brooklyn. Our group was involved with Phase One: scraping the walls clean, taping of areas that did not need to be painted, and priming the walls for the actual paint job. It was hot and sticky and the rooms were tiny and dusty, but I believe that I speak on behalf of all my fellow interns when I say that it was one of the most fruitful moments of our internship.



Being able to give back to society is truly a privilege and one that few can afford. I feel humbled to think that our small actions of painting a wall may brighten the lives of the children. I personally believe it is important that we all do our part in our own little way, for each action contributes to the grand total. The Barbarian interns plan to follow through by hosting a company potluck lunch, the proceeds of which will go back to New York Cares.

After all, it costs you nothing to put a smile on the face of another!



My name is Akshay Kapur. I’m the Finance intern from Mumbai, India. I’m a rising senior at Franklin & Marshall College out in Lancaster Pennsylvania, where I’m majoring in Business, Organizations and Society when I’m not chilling with the Amish folk.
I am a creator and I spend the majority of my hours at The Barbarian Group transfixed in Photoshop. I’d like to think I don’t just make pretty pictures, but rather bring ideas to life. To clarify, a person who leans toward being a creator is not necessarily creative. More importantly, they must be capable of creating and identifying people’s needs.

The Art and Creative Directors at Barbarian have allowed me to see this first hand. In the last couple weeks, I have seen multiple brands come to life and, for the lack of better words, “be cool.” We remember ads that are funny, interesting, daring, and beautiful. When I sit down with all the brushes and filters at my disposal, my first goal is not to make something that is “on brand.” It’s to make something that has the potential to be remembered. And it all begins in the brief.

I’ve been able to gaze into the mystical waters of the strategy department. After extensive research, the brief should be complete, but the next step is actually to research even more. Without the directions and insights supplied by those in strategy, creatives are swimming in a vast sea of ideas that are applicable to any brand. In my time here, I’ve learned the creative industry is not about “ah ha moments,” but rather hard work and late-night perfection. Specific insights lead to specific creative direction, and subsequently for me, specific visuals. I now understand why we say “It’s gonna be awesome.”



My name is Philip Czapla, a senior at the School of Design at RIT. I plan to graduate in December and pursue my passion for international adventure!

I am a creator and I spend the majority of my hours at The Barbarian Group transfixed in Photoshop. I’d like to think I don’t just make pretty pictures, but rather bring ideas to life. To clarify, a person who leans toward being a creator is not necessarily creative. More importantly, they must be capable of creating and identifying people’s needs.

The Art and Creative Directors at Barbarian have allowed me to see this first hand. In the last couple weeks, I have seen multiple brands come to life and, for the lack of better words, “be cool.” We remember ads that are funny, interesting, daring, and beautiful. When I sit down with all the brushes and filters at my disposal, my first goal is not to make something that is “on brand.” It’s to make something that has the potential to be remembered. And it all begins in the brief.

I’ve been able to gaze into the mystical waters of the strategy department. After extensive research, the brief should be complete, but the next step is actually to research even more. Without the directions and insights supplied by those in strategy, creatives are swimming in a vast sea of ideas that are applicable to any brand. In my time here, I’ve learned the creative industry is not about “ah ha moments,” but rather hard work and late-night perfection. Specific insights lead to specific creative direction, and subsequently for me, specific visuals. I now understand why we say “It’s gonna be awesome.”


My name is Philip Czapla, a senior at the School of Design at RIT. I plan to graduate in December and pursue my passion for international adventure!
At The Barbarian Group, we create cool things for the Internet. In our early stages, that meant we created cool things that primarily lived on PCs and laptops. Today, you’re probably reading this blog post on your mobile device or tablet, because the Internet is embedded in the devices that are part of our daily lives. This is good news for The Barbarian Group - we create digital products and experiences that engage consumers across digital platforms of all kinds.

Our Sketch Club series is one way in which we stretch our creative muscles and practice designing for the future. Barbarians from different departments use it to practice thinking about the evolution of everyday products in our increasingly digital world. At Sketch Club, anything goes. Any idea is a potential future. You don’t even have to know how to draw! If you’re less visual, you can write your idea out in words.

We typically start with a group of objects. Some of the objects are so old, they are more like relics  (e.g. cassette tape player). We spend time imagining the future of these objects. What form can they take? What function will they serve for our future selves?

Sometimes we combine objects to create a new product with an entirely new purpose. We bring our ideas to life through Design Fiction storytelling. For example, Jane will have more fun at the beach with her solar powered umbrella, because it can power her stereo. This practice helps keep our minds open to the untamed possibilities of the future.

Feeling inspired by all this talk of the future? Check out The Barbarian Group Sketch Club blog and organize a club of your own!



I’m Justine Takacs and I’m interning with the UX department at The Barbarian Group this summer. I’m a Creative Technology graduate student at the VCU Brandcenter. I keep the user top of mind and aim to #MakeThingsNotAds.

At The Barbarian Group, we create cool things for the Internet. In our early stages, that meant we created cool things that primarily lived on PCs and laptops. Today, you’re probably reading this blog post on your mobile device or tablet, because the Internet is embedded in the devices that are part of our daily lives. This is good news for The Barbarian Group - we create digital products and experiences that engage consumers across digital platforms of all kinds.

Our Sketch Club series is one way in which we stretch our creative muscles and practice designing for the future. Barbarians from different departments use it to practice thinking about the evolution of everyday products in our increasingly digital world. At Sketch Club, anything goes. Any idea is a potential future. You don’t even have to know how to draw! If you’re less visual, you can write your idea out in words.

We typically start with a group of objects. Some of the objects are so old, they are more like relics (e.g. cassette tape player). We spend time imagining the future of these objects. What form can they take? What function will they serve for our future selves?

Sometimes we combine objects to create a new product with an entirely new purpose. We bring our ideas to life through Design Fiction storytelling. For example, Jane will have more fun at the beach with her solar powered umbrella, because it can power her stereo. This practice helps keep our minds open to the untamed possibilities of the future.

Feeling inspired by all this talk of the future? Check out The Barbarian Group Sketch Club blog and organize a club of your own!


I’m Justine Takacs and I’m interning with the UX department at The Barbarian Group this summer. I’m a Creative Technology graduate student at the VCU Brandcenter. I keep the user top of mind and aim to #MakeThingsNotAds.